I didn't want to post these photos until they had finally begun the demolition, but as I type, the guys are starting to remove the asbestos tiles from the old extension. Very exciting, although it would appear from any passer by that we are living in a leper colony from the amount of danger signage and barricades they've put up around us (don't worry, we're quite separate in the front of the house, and I'll be gone most of the day at any rate). I thought I'd post the before photos. These are photos of the old playroom and the bathroom that was used as the laundry. Thank God we put in new bathrooms before we moved in.


You can see the way they've done two roofs - the pitched one was the old back veranda, the other the flat roofed bit they tacked onto it.
Nothing like a nice, solid brick wall overlooking your back garden. Very pleasant from inside.

The inside view looking over the back garden
rotting timber boards, gutters with holes, windows with thin plate glass that rattle in their rotting frames
We'd often walk out to find bits had dropped off the playroom overnight
Old unused water tank on stand (more a  home for rats). The painted brick bit is the old bathroom
Old bathroom with Maroon Suite (bath/ toilet/ basin) We never thankfully had to use this.
Bathroom with its blue and maroon scheme. Used this for my laundry.
Another angle of the playroom
The main windows face North and it's hellishly hot in Summer. Whole thing is rotting and the windows used to scare the life out of me when the kids banged against them in case they went through.

Interior shot. The blackboard is to cover up the sooty fireplace. Those are the floor tiles with asbestos in them. The rear wall with tiling was the previous owners laundry. Nothing like an open laundry in the corner of your living area.

It was all starting to come apart at the seams. In several areas you could see daylight.
The neat junction between the old house and the 60's addition. Tacked on doesn't even begin to describe it.
I'm sure you can see by these photos why we have been itching to get on with the demolition. It was a very poorly built and ill thought out addition - essentially it turns its back on the rear garden, instead putting the windows over looking the side fence. The back terrace was too hot to use in Summer as it had no shading and faced West - it was like a furnace in the evening radiating heat back up at you. Very unpleasant. It was also fairly poorly built - the floor sloped, the roof leaked, and most of the interior detailing was designed to cover up awkward junctions that the builder had created.

We are reasonably comfortable in the front of the house - I am keeping our bedroom as an oasis of calm, every other room has stuff stacked in corners and shoved in any available cupboard, but if we can go into our bedroom, dressing room and ensuite and feel normal, then that will make it bearable.

So, exciting to finally start! If you're new to the blog, you might want to click on the Before and After links on the side to see the renovation we did on the front of the house. I'll try to post the Master Bedroom next week.... haven't had time to take the photos this week.

39 comments:

  1. And to think I just commented that there was always something pretty on your blog! ;)

    The maroon bathroom suite is particularly fetching. The old homestead we were in when I first started blogging (gorgeous and rambling but 500m from one of the busiest highways in WA yet 40km from town so managed to be both noisy but isolated! - hence why we moved when we bought the farm we are on now) had an ensuite with pink tiles couple with a bathroom suite in the same colours as the blue tiles on your maroon wall. So special it made me feel nauseous.

    I think the extension you are demolishing looks even worse as the rest of the house is so stunning and well built. I am sure it will be amazing when finished. Looking forward to the after photos.

    Excuse long and rambling comment. Got up way too early as we had a storm then a small fire and then rain so all OK now. All that before half past seven has frazzled my mind.

    Take care and have a wonderful day.

    T

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha ha T, I was thinking of you when I posted these pictures, as they're definitely not pretty!!
      Your old place's bathroom sounds so lovely. Honestly when you look at the vile tiles in ours, and the brown mosaic floor, you would think "yes, it's a good idea to paint the walls maroon to tie it all together". Especially with all the natural light that was flooding that room.
      We've been referring to the back room as "the Pimple". The more we've done to the front, the worse it looks. It's always made us laugh when someone stops us out the front of the house to say what a lovely job we've done, then asks "are you planning to do anything to the back?". It was always tempting to look shocked and say "No, of course not!"
      Love your rambling comments T. Glad to hear the fire is out, and all is safe at the homestead. xx

      Delete
  2. Utterly awful! It will make for a fabulous before and after. It is amazing what people will tack on to a beautiful house. Our rental is a gorgeous block fronted Melbourne classic with amazing cornices etc. In the tacked on living area are inset factory fluorescent lights... Loathed by me and even the kids...

    Good luck with operation asbestos. X

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the block fronted houses in Melbourne - I've used the grey render colour and block impression as inspiration for the render on the extension.
      Nothing like fluoro lights in a house to make it feel nice and homely too Ann! xx

      Delete
  3. Wow, the things people do to houses huh? It will be amazing I'm sure once your renovation is complete, you can see it just needs some love put back into it :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think pretty much anything will be better than what we've got N! Hopefully my design will do the front of the house justice with the extension, and it won't look like the afterthought this does! xx

      Delete
  4. Oh I can see why you are in such a hurry to get rid of it- such an eyesore compared to the rest of your lovely house!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's awful. Every time it rained I had to run out and move things around so they didn't get in the drip lines. xx

      Delete
  5. Just a reminder of all the horrors built in the 50's & 60's...Wonder if the current crop of ugly developments will be viewed in restrospect as horrors as well. They don't build them like they used to do they?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure at the time this looked the business Linda! I'm sure the current boxy developments will be viewed with equal derision in the future. xx

      Delete
  6. Hi Heidi, I've just come across your blog. You must be so excited and relieved that the old extension is coming down!
    I've spent a good couple of hours reading through your blog when I should be working!
    We're about to embark upon a renovation of our very cramped inner-city Federation terrace in Sydney, and your blog will be a great source of inspiration two me, I think.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so happy that the demolition is finally beginning... it's felt like pulling teeth to get to this point! Your house will look beautiful I'm sure - love the terraces in Sydney, and they do come up well. xx

      Delete
  7. Well I took your advice and visited your older blogs, what a beautiful house snd I like that blue Adelaide stone . Sydney being a sandstone sort of place, which I do love of course. As for the massive back garden wow!

    Is the limestone mantelpiece in? I really like it as well as the hall lights, why are lighting fixtures so difficult , lots to consider I guess., yours are great...

    Even agree with your mother's favourite perfume ..Caleche ..mine too always has been, always will be

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most houses of the era of ours in Adelaide are Sandstone too smr, bluestone is probably 1/3, with 2/3 sandstone. Almost no brick interestingly. The back garden is the tennis court.... not exactly match ready! But we bought the house because we loved the look of it, plus it had the land we were looking for. The mantlepiece is going into the new extension, it's currently housed in my Dad's barn. Love that you wear Caleche xx

      Delete
  8. It is soo exciting. I will go back and see the other pics.

    I can't wait to see the progress!

    Looks like you have a lot of space to work with.

    Good luck Heidi xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do have a lot of space, but we didn't want to encroach too much on the back garden. Fortunately its a wide block, so we are going out to the sides. xx

      Delete
  9. good luck!!! cannot wait to see what you'll do to the garden as well x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm meeting with the landscape designer tomorrow! Can't wait xx

      Delete
  10. Oh that is a going to be a big job, but how thrilling when you get to the end of it.
    I'd like to build a little garden room one day, something Palm Springs - ish and radically different from our old house.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a big job.... already feels like a big one just getting it to this point! I started on the plans this time last year... I'd love to see your future garden room built- I can't imagine Palm Springs in Scotland, it would be total escapism xx

      Delete
  11. Dear Heidi

    How brave you are! Would never have dared to take on such a challenge. I guess being an architect makes it easier - or maybe harder as you knew even more about the horrors of the extension. But it will be fabulous when finished. Will look forward so much to seeing the after shots - and what you do with the garden!

    Good luck with it all!

    Best wishes

    pamela

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My family likes to do renovations.... so growing up with it has normalised it for me I think. Mr AV is already saying "never again". According to his mother, he hated the major renovation that their family did when he was 15. Our Melbourne renovation was far worse than this and he survived, but we had no children and went to work every day which was an escape. We actually moved into our house in Melbourne with no power, and there were gaps in the wall where the weeds were growing through (it was a weatherboard). So really, this doesn't seem so bad! That said, if there's no progress on site, I start to get very grumpy! xx

      Delete
  12. Oh Heidi....you saved the best for last! Can't wait to see how it all ends up....these pictures will make for unbelievable 'before' and 'after' stories. It must feel euphoric actually starting the obliteration...ride the wave for as long as you can and keep your eyes on the prize! Rx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's been interesting reading everyone's comments. I'd sort of not realised I hadn't put photos of the back up (aside from the ones in "the story of our house" post absolutely ages ago). I guess I've written about it, but not illustrated it. It's so Ugly...! It will make for good after photos, and I'm sure there'll be bad days (and weeks) ahead, but I'm going to look back on the before photos and be happy that this is gone! xx

      Delete
  13. It is going to be amazing, I'm sure. I am very much looking forward to seeing the 'after' pictures. What a fantastic project... surely every architect needs a big project?!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, I would never have been happy living with someone else's design. As my husband is not overly fond of renovations, I think it will be a long time before we do another one of this scale too. xx

      Delete
  14. Absolutely incredible! I'm most excited to see the garden, but of course intrigued by the rest of it as well. When we were house hunting it was the properties with "possibility" that most appraled to me. We even put in an offer on one, but after the inspection turned up everytthing from termites to water and plumbing problems to roof problems, my husband got cold feet. So we ended up in a newly redone house where everything is new, but nothing is as I would have done it. Someday, and until then I live vicariously through blogs like yours!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our first place in Melbourne had major problems, so we picked it up cheaply. The floors had collapsed in places, but I knew that wasn't a huge expense to fix. Factoring in all the problems to rectify it, it was still a very cheap house to buy. It's actually rare to find an old unrenovated house cheaply in Australia - everyone thinks they're getting a bargain, underestimates how much it will cost to renovate and then pays too much for them. They actually fetch a premium. Our new house was not a bargain like our first, but I think with our renovations we'll still add value to it on top of the cost of the renovation works. xx

      Delete
  15. Just want to tell you how much I enjoy your blog. I am an ex-Adelaide girl myself, though I can't see myself ever moving back. Have to say it's a travesty that anyone was ever allowed to build that addition. You can always tell the difference between those who use an architect and those who get their builders to draw up some plans and whack a room on the side of the house. Wish people would realise that doing it right means an increase in the value of probably their most important asset.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Toula, I kept an eye on the real estate market in Adelaide for a long time before we bought our house, and a lot of the lovely old villas had such awful modern renovations done on them - family rooms with a square cut out of the corner to house a laundry (so you had direct access to the back garden from it I'd guess, but at what cost!), terrible kitchens etc... they weren't even the ones with the hopeless 60's bits on them either. I can always tell when an Architect is involved or not involved, and I think it does add value.xx

      Delete
  16. Oh lordy lordy! Thrilled to see we are not the only crazy family who buys wrecks of houses and attempts to live in them during renovations!! But this one is seriously impressively crying for help. Lucky for the house you found it, and not somebody who may have simply taken a ball and chain to the whole lot, based on the work required to the back.

    I noted your comment about premiums being paid for originals - couldn't agree more - I think sometimes the bargains are now the ones which are done up (to taste or otherwise) - it is a changing market. xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've always said the same thing Virginia to people that ask for my advice when looking for a house - buy something renovated in a fairly ugly manner, but solidly done, in the 80's/90's - they're the bargains. Most people seem able to look beyond the layers in a Victorian house and think they're getting potential and a beautiful blank slate, then pay a lot for it. As for living in it during the renovations.... in some ways its just a lot easier to be on site than off - I can keep an eagle eye on proceedings! xx

      Delete
  17. Good luck Heidi. You are a very brave girl! That said your house and garden will look superb when complete. Love the before photos. Gosh how ugly! Loving your blog too. Jane xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jane, thanks for the words of encouragement - it can only get better! xx

      Delete
  18. Great pictures Heidi....exciting indeed! We renovated the main bathroom in our previous home, a big reno project, before we moved in as it was in a similar state although the pale pink and chalky green tiles were easier in the eye than the fetching moroon of yours. I agree wholeheartedly that an oasis of calm and visual serenity is essential for the survival of anyone takling a live-in reno project. In my current home (a new build but as you go type)I'm drinking my afternoon wine in my linen cupboard; the only completed area. Bliss! LOL! Looking forward to your newest challenge with great interest, empathy and support! x KL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. KL, you've made me laugh at the image of you in your linen cupboard quietly enjoying a glass of wine! We all need a little sanctuary somewhere. I've been enjoying seeing your new place slowly being revealed too xx

      Delete
  19. Oh this post brought back some memories of my Uncle's first house in Adelaide. His was very similar with gorgeous stone at the front and hideous extension at the back. I so can't wait to see the after photos now!!! xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those 60's/ 70's renos were all the go. We had quite a lot of friends who would come and sit in that room, look around and say they liked it because it reminded them of their childhoods! xx

      Delete
  20. Gosh Heidi, what a great post, it must have been a lot of work to do the work plus the post!

    Thanks for being so conscientious and taking us through the design process...

    I am also due to begin an extension so the genesis of any window or appliance choice is rather interesting.

    I bet your hard work paid off in the end though!

    But you have made it open and cosy all at the same time.

    It's a pity those houses aren't just that mich bigger...

    But love the before and after stuff, am a total sucker for them...

    Great stuff x

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Search This Blog

About Me

My photo
Architect & Interior Designer. Mother of three. A sometimes Cook, Baker, Reader, Gardener, Fashion Lover, Renovator, Writer of random things in South Australia email me on anadelaidevilla@bigpond.com
Powered by Blogger.

Follow by Email

Follow this blog with bloglovin

Follow on Bloglovin

Followers

Things to read....

.