As many long term readers know, I have a fondness for the old and the antique. I quite like a bit of patina here and there, as I feel it gives gravitas to a decorative scheme and stops it from looking like a shiny new show home that no one lives in.


As a child I used to spend countless hours trailing my Mother and Grandmother and Aunts around Antique fairs, Antique stores, Church Fetes, Bric a Brac shops and, of course, Op Shops (Thrift Stores for overseas readers). Buying a bargain is an inherited family condition I'm afraid (one of my Aunt's ran an Antique store on Unley Road for a few years, and another Aunt and Uncle managed to supply most of the family with furniture when they moved to Adelaide from Glasgow, Scotland in the 80's after they had acquired a sizeable amount of furniture/ china and sundry items from the local Car boot sales and Auction houses). As an adult I have found myself gravitating to exactly the same sources for my own furniture choices, mixed in with a little bit of modern furniture bought new that is suited to family life.

As I've written previously, we lived in a very small Cottage in Melbourne for 10 years. This meant that when we moved back to Adelaide (and into a large family sized home) that we had larger spaces and we required more furniture. This was not a bad thing - accommodating a family of 5 on one 3 seater sofa doesn't work particularly well frankly. But it has meant that I've had quite a bit of furniture to buy, and that I still have to buy, and I'm taking my time in doing so. I want to ensure that the pieces I put in our home are there for the long term.



Buying secondhand is the best way to stretch your budget, and frankly, the best way to find interesting pieces for your home. Some items are not so easily able to be bought secondhand - the coffee table that we recently took delivery of (above) was a custom made piece, as I needed something that was 1.4 x 1.4 m, and most shops had far smaller tables available (and this is naturally not something that you can buy at the local Auction rooms as historically coffee tables did not exist - they are a recent invention, and certainly not made in the sizes that they are today). We've been really pleased with it - it looks perfect in the space and has filled in the void that was existing visually, as well as of course providing a practical place to put a glass of wine or platter of nibbles.



But a primary source of furniture have been the local estate Auction houses. This requires some dedication to looking at the listings every week, but you can find some absolute gems. This is a little Regency era (1811- 1820) card table (above) I bought last Monday night, and it complements a large watercolour painting also bought at a local auction house a few months ago. Neither piece were expensive - certainly to buy a new, designer piece of furniture made to the equivalent standard of finish as the table would cost at least 3x's as much as buying an antique. As for the painting, the cost of the frame with its linen mount would be almost as much as I paid for the whole thing, and given the artist had a gallery in Woollarah, Sydney, it was a fraction of the price it would have cost new (plus we really love it). These items are going into the new Library (now that we are not using it as our everyday living space).

 But you do need to be dedicated - I can go months not seeing anything of interest, and then find 3 things in a week…and you have to be prepared to lose some items - there are many more pieces that I've lost out on by being outbid by $10 at the last minute (I usually leave an absentee bid as I can't attend an auction with children). Or there's the situation that occurred on the weekend, when I completely forgot to bid on some chairs I was very keen to buy. Of course they sold for a low amount, and I am SO unhappy with myself. I'll probably now see them in a local antique store for three times the price. Sob!

But I was flicking through a few design magazines on the weekend, and came across a couple of things that I found interesting - one was this Branford dresser from Pottery Barn. It costs $1,849.00 and is in an antique style. I just can't understand why you'd want to buy this when you can pick up an antique chest of drawers for around $800 in the Auction rooms (and sometimes less). The antique will be over 100 years old, solid timber, beautifully made and have a real patina to it (rather than the Pottery Barn faux created patina).


I saw that Domayne furniture are doing a range of Mid Century modern inspired pieces, such as the item below - a Metro Buffet for $1,849 - again, you can buy the real deal at the local auction houses for a fraction of the retail on a new piece, and the old pieces are generally better made. I've used these two items as examples as auction room are full of these things - they're staples.


But for other items I've found Ebay or Gumtree are also good sources - one of my earliest posts on the blog was on blue and white china, and my love of Isis Ceramics. Two of my Isis items were absolute Ebay bargains. This lamp base below was $20, and the flower brick (at the top of this post) was $5. The retail on the flower bricks are $250, the lamp a lot more.



I bought this bookcase below quite cheaply for my daughter's room a few years ago from a local seller on Ebay and repainted it. It looks appropriate for the decorative style of her room, and is the perfect sized bookcase for her.


Gumtree is also good source of modern sofas and modern dining settings in particular, things that wouldn't go to an auction house as they're worth more than they'd get there, but for whatever reason someone has to sell the item - they might have sold their house and the furniture is too large for instance. The photos I've included below are from my friend's Gumtree listing, she is selling her beautiful 10 seater solid oak Jardan dining table. If anyone in Adelaide is interested her listing is here - but this illustrates that you can find anything from the Designer to the Junky.



This post is getting long on examples - I could keep going and show you my Waterford Crystal glasses that were $25 each instead of $210, or the genuine old wicker laundry basket (instead of a newer faux wicker one) that was $10, but I think I've illustrated my point sufficiently! I'd just suggest that the first step when decorating should not necessarily be a big box furniture store. Even when an item is on sale you can often find similar items cheaper elsewhere. Certainly if the aesthetic you're going for is more traditional, then buying the real deal via an antique is far better on your wallet, and will add a lot more to an interior than one full of faux antiques. As you can see, I have a wide mix of the new, the very old, fine antiques, second hand and everything in between. I also have some items from big box stores like Pottery Barn or Ikea - but I think it's the mix that is important in giving a character filled home.

Any other avid Auction room attendees or Gumtree/ eBay success stories out there? I know I can't be the only one with a good bargain story to tell!

48 comments:

  1. i am so with you Heidi, but then my house is full of antiques and collectibles - most inherited and some purchased by myself. My grandmother was actually an antiques expert and wrote the definitive book on antiques in our province. I love the mix of old and new and I do believe that my old pieces give my home the soul that, for me at least, I do not see in homes where everything is brand new. Love your pieces!

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    1. That's so wonderful about your grandmother Wendy!! It's definitely an inherited family trait. I was thinking about your lovely dining chairs as I wrote this. I think there is something lovely about a home with stories - whether it be with bits and pieces collected on travels, or inherited from family or found in an odd location…. sort of the meaning of home for me

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  2. Like many, I love the Eames/ Scandi furniture.
    What are these estate Auction places you speak of?

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    1. Well, the local auction houses, rather than Sotheby's or Christies or Bonhams - those are the places where you pay a 22% buyers premium and find they're auctioning Jeffrey Smart paintings and rare antiques. The local auction houses are just the places that do estate sales once a week - if you check the yellow pages or google "Auction house" you'll find some in your area. But I do know that Mossgreen in Melbourne often do Mid Century auctions (with the higher quality and collectable pieces), but also look to the consignment stores in Church Street Richmond as they often have the designer stuff in there heavily discounted.

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  3. and BTW I LOVE the coffee table x

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    1. thanks! We're really happy with it

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  4. Yes I have also noticed how much more expensive new stuff is! But a lot of people say they don't have patience and I also notice that the pr of auctions are that they are out of reach but in fact with patience it is the opposite! As you know I am also an auction fiend and I attend auctions that I have no chance of even considering to purchase but love the buzz all the same. I love the show antique roadshow with everyone's stories so love all your stories and wouldn't mind a part two?! My best buy and please don't think this was smug but it was one of those sequence of events that was in my favour. I went to an auction just after the financial meltdown in 2008 that had no reserve. It was a rare auction where everything was sold no matter what. There were a lot of various prints that I didn't even look at but the bid started at 10 quid and nobody was biting because some Italian made a scene because they had bid the previous lot but had not registered so all the regulars were absorbed in this drama so it was just the auctioneer and me paying attention to the lot and nobody was bidding and the auctioneer tried to hold by saying any bids, last bids about ten times which is not the norm and I raised my eyebrows as to say pound the gavel already! I finally won but the rest of the auction he didn't set the bids so low and started always at a 100 quid. but there were some prints in there that were editions whose cousins were in the national portrait gallery so I did well out of it. And no I didn't resell any and gave away some to friends( they were priced at around 50 p for the amount of prints I got) and framed them for myself. I am so sorry that you forgot to bid for those chairs though...But remember there is always next time!! x

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    1. I couldn't believe I missed the damn chairs!!!!!!! After all the build up to the chairs, I went and visited them to make sure they were good in person… and then totally forgot! So stupid (was one of those weekends)!
      You did so well with those prints! What an amazing bargain. I would be feeling very smugly pleased with myself over that, but how shonky of the auctioneer holding the auction like that! I so wish I lived in a big city for the auctions sometimes - by the time you pay the 22% buyers premium though, plus the freight to Adelaide for anything (exorbitant) it's rarely worth buying anything.

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    2. So wonderful to read about your successes at auctions. I've always been a tiny bit scared of auctions and have never succeeded in buying anything. My only real experience was in Colombo when I was bidding for a beautiful old dressing table. I suddenly realised that I was being scammed because there was really only me bidding and someone who I'm sure now was a plant by one of the dealers to bid the price up. So I suddenly pulled out and they were left with it. Think the auctioneer was in on it too because he kept trying to persuade me to make another bid.
      Don't think there'd be much here like the lovely finds you've had in Adelaide (I say nothing of London, of course) because Canberra is really such a small new city and most of the stuff I've seen has been fairly rubbishy or just not my taste. Adore the rose brick and lamp base, your daughter's bookcase and the card table. Also the painting. All of it really including the purpose made coffee table. And congrats Naomi for the pictures. Such a lucky day!
      Agree that all-new houses, including the designer ones in the glossies, can look pretty soulless. Love to see a mix of old and new, lots of books, pictures and fresh flowers. Your house is looking fabulous Heidi! Am so looking forward to seeing it. Also can't wait to pics of your reno Naomi!
      Best wishes, Pammie xx

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    3. Your talking of freight cots to Adelaide Heidi, reminded me that in the late 1950s my parents bought a 19th C Italian blackamoor (statue ) in Adelaide for 5 pounds , it cost a lot more than that to get her to Sydney. Her name is Christobel, she is wooden, covered with gesso and v. faded gilt/paint (not sure) and she has had a hard life . As a child I had to look up at her. She is in my living room

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    4. Pammie, Canberra is a difficult city, probably because it's got a fairly transient population, so people move with their things and I imagine there's not really an established market for antiques or second hand in the same way as other cities. At least you're close (ish) to Sydney?! That's very funny about the Colombo auction, lucky you worked it out when they got landed with the bid!

      smr, she sounds lovely and worth the expensive freight! There are some gems locally, but sadly almost anything really good goes to Sydney for sale now - Sotheby's have an office here for appraising, but don't do auctions.

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    5. Heidi, there is a good auction place in Canberra in Wiluna St, Fyshwick called Auction Barn. It runs an 'antique' auction every last Sunday of the month. Quality is definitely not top of the antique range but prices are VERY low, almost give-away in some cases. You never quite know what will turn up each month. The market for 19th century English antiques (Keating used to call them 'dead people's furniture') has completely collapsed and prices are at best 20% of what they were 20 years ago. So if you want an interesting, well made or solid timber piece the antique auction places are definitely the answer.

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  5. Heidi
    It's a personal thing for many people, isn't it, about always desiring 'brand new' stuff in preference to taking on others' pre-loved goods. Auction places are easily accessible in Adelaide, we have found, and certainly worth a look.
    Again, a thoughtful post that displays your wonderful writing skills (although perhaps a tad lengthy as you say). Trust all is well on the Plains for you.
    Cheers
    Melody

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    1. You're right Melody, I was going to write a bit about the psychology of buying 'new', but figured the post was getting long enough… I could probably write a 3 part series on this! I did work with a guy in Melbourne who had to have everything new- I gather he grew up in a fairly impoverished way, and for him new was a symbol of success. So he preferred to build a brand new home in a very outer suburb when at that time he could have bought for the same money a down at heel property in an up and coming inner city area, even though he knew it wouldn't make as much money in the long term as the inner city. I can see that some people get very caught up in the psychology behind having things new. I do think though that as we are bombarded by advertising that a lot of people forget about other options for buying things, and that there's an enormous range of things available with a bit of hunting. All fine here, just busy, and have been trying to write this post over the past week, but believe it or not it was a lot longer at various points!!

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  6. We inherited a great deal of antique furniture from my Father in Law who once had a store that dealt antiques. Some of it is in storage due to young ones. I'm happy to have a few disposable pieces in the mean time to get us through this stage. One day we'll renovate and decorate. Am inspired by your work and how far your house has come along x

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    1. You are lucky to have the old inventory - I bet you've got some wonderful pieces. Probably a good thing to have them somewhere protected until the kids are older… although truth be told the most damage done to our antique furniture has been accidental and by my husband!! I do call him my fourth child though… Glad you can see the progress on the house - sometimes I feel were not getting anywhere, progress is so slow!

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  7. I love a mish mash of everything. We have everything from family hand me downs, ikea, antique, handmade by husband to Moran sofas (which are the only expensive furniture we have purchased). A few more antiques would be nice. Perhaps when we finish paying school fees! It all kind of goes with the look of an Adelaide bungalow with a few cracks in the walls! I really dislike houses that are all new and everything is perfect. We have always put our money into old houses in good areas and have renovated, so never much money to buy furniture.
    Your house is looking lovely. I really like your approach of slowly buying the right pieces, instead of having it all at once.
    If you don't mind me asking, which auction houses do you go to in Adelaide?

    Amellia

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  8. I may have left 2 comments. The first one was on my phone and it seemed to disappear.

    Amellia

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    1. I think it did disappear, as I only got one! That's so annoying, I hate typing on my phone at the best of time.
      I think the problem with everything new is that it all starts to get a few chips and dents and not look quite so new fairly quickly, and then it just looks a bit shabby - if you have a mix, it's not nearly so noticeable. Perfection is a hard thing to live with. I think too with an old house that with cracks and things not being so perfect that the older furniture and things with patina just work better.
      I go to Scammells in Kent Town and Small and Whitfield in Unley Road - they have a weekly estate auction and Small and Whitfield have a monthly antique one as well. Both have their listings online, so I generally check those first on a Friday night or Saturday morning and then go down and duck in to have a look in person if something looks interesting. The table and painting were from the once a month S&W antique auction, but I often pick up bits and pieces from the weekly sales. DuPlessis have auctions every few months as well, but I tend not to go as they often bring in containers of furniture from overseas and sell it off, and it's not such an interesting mix as a general local auction.

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  9. Thanks for the tips. I did a google search and they were the two auction places that looked good! I will have to start having a regular browse.
    You are right about perfction being hard to live with. I don't think I have the energy or inclination with children to be constantly cleaning and tidying to achieve the perfect look.

    I do enjoy your blog.

    Amellia

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    1. Thanks Amellia, and good luck on the hunt!

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  10. I love how you operate Heidi! The Regency card table and watercolour look perfect together. When I was in the Army and just back from Iraq, I took an apartment about 20 miles off post (from Fort Bragg) in the tony little equestrian village of Southern Pines which is only 2 miles from golf mecca Pinehurst (just hosted U.S. Open) in the bottom floor of a lovely Victorian with wraparound porch. The 'Estella' of my life has a horse farm in Southern Pines and told me of the 'estate sales' and we attended every weekend. This was 2009 right after the financial upheaval and the area was known as primarily 2nd homes of people now often quite elderly. So with the younger set often having to liquidate and with the older set dropping like flies, it was very much a buyer's market and I made myself the apple of the sweet old lady's eye who ran the estate sales who would call me on the eve of the sale every week to breathlessly give me a quite elaborate preview of what the real gems were/their actual worth etc...it was like stealing!...I had my Victorian apartment looking like rooms in a Merchant Ivory movie in 3 months.

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    1. I am pea green with envy GSL!! When I hear stories like yours and Naomi's I wish the Financial Crisis had hit a little harder in Australia (well, not really, but you know….). What a lucky position to be in at the time, and how wonderful to rescue all those interesting bits and pieces - I've only attended one whole house sale, and it was frankly a depressing experience. The vultures were out in force, and as the whole house sale is so rare here the prices were ridiculous. Certainly no bargains to be had.

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  11. Coffee table looks great. I wholeheartedly agree with your views here. I love Lots Road near me and go most weekends.... 'treasure hunting'. Everything goes online on a Thursday and then if there is anything I fancy I pop round on Saturday. I will be using it as my primary source for furniture for our new house. I saw a gorgeous rug there a couple of weeks ago, but sadly have to spend on paint and flooring at the moment. I need to build up a bit of a war chest before I start bidding on things! I think that you'd get better value though at an auction house outside of central London, so I will have to look into that.
    xx

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    1. I used to love watching what was going in and out the doors at Lots Road, but yes, you do pay London prices (that said, it's so much cheaper in general for Antiques in London than Australia). You'll have a lot of fun finding pieces for your new home Charlotte, and once you've finished the decoration and refurb the local Auction rooms will be full of wonderful things waiting for you I'm sure!

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  12. I have a few antiques but Mr FF is the real collector and we can never believe how less 'spensive things are at auction. The last thing we got was a divine Murch (he won the archibald in maybe the 40s or 50s?) painting that was a fraction of retail. I don't understand why people would buy something from Pottery Barn when they could get an antique either. Romy is the auction Queen though! 2 of my Persian rugs and a settee thing are from auctions in 2004 and I still love them so much. Antiques are wildly unpopular round these here parts x

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    1. I love Romy's Auction finds! Her new peacock is fab. Rugs are another great thing to buy at Auction, they always sell for a fraction of what they are sold new. Most of my friends are not very interested in antiques either I'd have to say. Your finds sound fantastic, and I love that Mr FF loves collecting things

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  13. I like the way you have an electric mix...I have quite a lot of antique furniture , inherited not bought , the big Victorian pieces can be bought for a song at auction as no one wants them anymore. Im lucky I live in a big old flat with high ceilings.

    As a child I grew up with a mother who held all her family possessions in great esteem and whoa behold any child who damaged anything, so I learnt to appreciate things early on , that and being dragged to every antique shop in the eastern suburbs. My sister and I once got lost in Paddington when we wandered off when our parents were in an antique shop. A woman took us to the police station where my parents found us. We both still have the antique/old mugs mum bought us me after we were found.

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    1. You're so lucky to have lots of family pieces. I was telling my Dad the other day how much he'd likely get for his enormous Victorian dining table if he were to sell it at Auction today, and he was horrified. Antiques in the early 80's were still highly desirable, whereas now they definitely seem to be out of fashion, especially the big Victorian pieces like sideboards and tables and chair sets. They really are at rock bottom prices. I suspect the death of the formal Dining room has a hand in it too. Most of my generation don't have a formal dining room now. Love that you still have those mugs smr, and the story to go with them!

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  14. Are the leaves in your top flower arrangement lambs ears ? dont know the real name for them but they're grey/green and fluffy and soft

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    1. Yes, lambs ears! They grow so easily and do look lovely in a posy.

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    2. Hello,

      Sorry to interrupt.....they are Stachys lanata if you wish to track them down. Great plant, thrives on neglect.

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    3. i did google them now you kindly gave us the name, they remind me of my grandmother's garden

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  15. What a great post! I agree with all your observations! I think buying well second hand requires some knowledge of the item's quality etc...which a younger generation dont understand and therefor cannot appreciate. And they sometime require a little elbow grease to bring them back which many younger ones aren't prepared to do hence the 'replica' PB success. We have many beautiful Australian Antiques stored; they dont suit this home and are not 'fashionable' atm. One day we'll have a suitable abode again. I've sold or given away much of our previous homes furniture on Gumtree; it was Balinese in style and no longer suited. I think that's the thing, peoples tastes change and my offcast Bali style is someone else's new found love. Those that received my items were all appreciative of the low price and condition of the pieces; I was thrilled that someone else would love them as I had.

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    1. My sister is a little like you KL - she changes her style every 8 years or so, and tends to sell off a few of her bits and pieces and then do a different look. But she's also Queen of the Auction rooms, and used to buy and sell things when she lived in Sydney and was a student. There was an auction room down the road from her and she'd then sell things on eBay and make money from them. I'm glad you've held onto your antiques, I'm sure you'll find a way of incorporating them into your home one day. We've had periods where we've had to store furniture for a few years, and I'm so happy to now be able to get them out and use them.

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  16. The painting is absolutely stunning, what a find!!! I love original artwork and it's so difficult to find even one piece that speaks to the heart. I am still kicking myself for passing up on an ink drawing that I saw at an art show about 10 years ago - I was a very poor student at the time and couldn't bring myself to pony up the money for it. In retrospect, I wish I had just bought it because I still think about it now! I am also very fond of antiques and period furnishings, and would love to invest in something like a set of Eames chairs and a solidly built dining table, but it will have to wait a little longer until the kids are older. Right now, our current furniture is getting seriously abused from the kids bouncing off it. Fantastic post, Heidi, thank you!

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    1. That's very sad that you've got a one that got away Louise! Especially if it's something you're thinking about all these years later.
      I was very tempted when we were buying our new dining table 5 years ago to buy a beautiful, very modern dining table (and I still love the style), but I remember getting home and watching my 3 year old gouging our existing dining table with his fork (before I stopped him) and thinking whatever we bought had to hide the signs of family life. So we ended up getting a rougher styled recycled wood table. Sometimes you have to compromise, but kids are only little for a while, so I'm sure with only a few more years you'll be able to get some special pieces that you'll have forever.

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  17. Hello Heidi,

    We absolutely love the way in which you combine the old with the new. This is very much in line with our own style of decorating and we do think that interiors look so much more interesting when there are vintage pieces sitting alongside the modern. Somehow one looks so much more carefully.

    But your eye for composition is terrific and your house is looking so wonderful. You must be so pleased with it all and it is definitely worth waiting for the right pieces to come along before buying.

    Far too many interiors these days, in our view, are co-ordinated and this just looks rather boring or, as an aged parent would have said, too 'newly married'. No better by far to have an eclectic mix which looks so much more exciting!

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    1. "Newly married" - you've made me giggle! You've reminded me of a friend commenting that your washing machine, vacuum cleaner and dryer always seem to need to be replaced at once, as they were all purchased at the same time when setting up home! I think a more eclectic mix does make for a more interesting interior, and certainly makes for a much more personal home.

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  18. Love your work! what a great post. I agree - much prefer the old. But you do have to have the patience and time to wait it out to get a good buy. I much prefer the 'real thing' over the the reproduction. And congratulations on a stunning coffee table. And I know what you mean about taking your time to get good pieces you want to keep. To that end, I STILL don't have a coffee table, and it took me an unreasonable amount of time to choose rug, and yet I bought the home I live in now on the internet while living overseas?!? ridiculous x

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    1. So funny Kimberley - I think a lot of people put more thought (or over thought) into furniture purchases than they do a house, so you wouldn't be alone! I think coffee tables are actually quite hard - you need something that works with the dimensions for one, and that narrows the choice down a lot. Then there's the aesthetic factor… well, good luck! That's why I eventually went the custom route.

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    2. This reminded me of a true story told by an old acquaintance. She had some unexpected family visitors turn up around lunch time so went out for a loaf of bread. On her walk to the corner store she passed an auction about to start. She rather liked the house so stopped to see what it would go for. There weren't many offers and it was going so cheaply that she suddenly found herself bidding. Next minute she discovered she'd bought a house. She returned home and everyone wondered why she'd been gone so long and didn't have any bread!!! Pammie xxx

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    3. Hilarious Pammie! There was a story in the paper a couple of weeks ago about a couple going to look for an Open Garden, seeing a crowd and finding it was an auction, jumping out and buying the house without going inside for a look even. Very unusual I'd think!!

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    4. Agree. High risk impulsive behaviour - but in her case it apparently worked out well. They moved in and loved it. Pammie

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  19. Don't you have a super art and antique collection going on there Heidi!
    Auctions are so exciting at Christies and Bonhams here in London. Worth going just for the fun of watching. Especially watching the drama of the jewellery and fine art auctions. They're very often better than going to a gallery or exhibition! Then there's Kerry Taylor for fashion, costume, and textiles...always an eyeopener with an amazing across the decades range.

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    1. Oh goodness, I'd love to go to the big auctions in London and just people watch and watch the theatre of it all. But the quality of the things on offer is always amazing too. Definitely nothing of that calibre over this side of the world (or very little of it at any rate!)

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  20. I so am with you on this Heide, I am a long term fan of estate sale(Clearing sales in the country) and have picked up some lovely pieces namely a beautiful rug that now sits under my dining table in Melb, paintings and other furniture. One they are hard to find when you go looking for that special piece and i so like the story behind the acquisition. I have also been a fan of op shops- it is so amazing what people will throw out. As the old saying another mans trash can be your treasure. As i look for new furniture sometimes, I am nearly always underwhelmed by the workmanship and craftsmanship and find the old auction buys have a quality that is often very hard to find.
    The mix of furniture gives the home that lived in look and in the end it all works if you love it and it suits your lifestyle. We still have our first big purchase a black leather lounge suite that still looks good-actually better with age- that is now 30 years old- in our farm house- it still is not only practical,looks good but I don't have to have a conniption any time my husband or kids sit on it in their farm clothes. Even though i have enjoyed your house renovations so much- i am a first time responder to your blog- i love all you do, you are very talented and look forward to your house and garden develop. Cheers Marilyn at wood_farm

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    1. Leather does age well Marilyn - I almost prefer it than brand new in some ways. That's so impressive that it's lasted so long for you! I too find the workmanship lacking in a lot of modern furniture. There are some furniture companies still making good quality furniture, but it seems that there is a big discrepancy in price with that and then the next bracket down being all about veneers and drawers that are on drawer slides that rattle when you pull them in and out and things that will likely get the wobbles fairly quickly.
      I'm looking forward to the garden develop too Marilyn! Hopefully next week a lot of planting will get done.

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Architect & Interior Designer. Mother of three. A sometimes Cook, Baker, Reader, Gardener, Fashion Lover, Renovator, Writer of random things in South Australia email me on anadelaidevilla@bigpond.com
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